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Church 2.0 refers to the general influence, convergence, and parallels of Web 2.0 philosophies on Christian churches adopting the internet to build online community. Many of the principles of Church 2.0 resemble those of the missional emerging church, but can apply to all churches seeking online community regardless of denomination or affiliation. Proponents of Church 2.0 expect an evolution of church web usage from static information websites to interactive and dynamic collaborative communities that reflect their offline communities.

Web 2.0 memes: Web 2.0 | Advertising 2.0 | Church 2.0 | Community 2.0 | Dinner 2.0 | Education 2.0 | ELearning 2.0 | Enterprise 2.0 | Giving 2.0 | Identity 2.0 | Law 2.0 | Learning 2.0 | Library 2.0 | Marketing 2.0 | Media 2.0 | Office 2.0 | Portals 2.0 | Presence 2.0 | Programming 2.0 | Search 2.0 | Trademark 2.0 | Travel 2.0 | Add yours | View all

Key PrinciplesEdit

  • Decentralized organizational structure that gives voice to individual members of the congregation.
  • Dynamic and modular (rather than vertical and static) hierarchy that promotes collaboration and participation both online and offline.
  • Trust in congregation members as co-developers of the church’s online content and image.
  • Authentic and transparent personalities of church leaders and members through interactive blogging and social networking.
  • Open discussion inviting multiple perspectives and questions on sermons and Biblical teaching
  • Church websites and communities that are dynamic, not static, and get richer as more of the congregation participates.


HistoryEdit

The term Church 2.0 was first coined by Emergent Church Proponent, Andrew Jones, in his [1]blog on November 29, 2005 as a direct spin-off of the term Web 2.0. He defined Church 2.0 as “a missional ecclesiastic response to a culture influenced by the values of Web 2.0.” Jones noted the similarities of Web 2.0 ideas to the emergent churches led and started by media-savvy internet users and bloggers. He suggested the Church 2.0 term is most appropriate for alternative faith communities that first connect online, and then seek physical face-to-face meetings.


Other References to Church 2.0Edit

Jim Gilliam http://www.jimgilliam.com/2005/04/church_20.php
A list of references to Church 2.0 and church related Web 2.0 Web sites http://2.0church.net

External linksEdit

Web 2.0 memes: Web 2.0 | Advertising 2.0 | Church 2.0 | Community 2.0 | Dinner 2.0 | Education 2.0 | ELearning 2.0 | Enterprise 2.0 | Giving 2.0 | Identity 2.0 | Law 2.0 | Learning 2.0 | Library 2.0 | Marketing 2.0 | Media 2.0 | Office 2.0 | Portals 2.0 | Presence 2.0 | Programming 2.0 | Search 2.0 | Trademark 2.0 | Travel 2.0 | Add yours | View all

Smallwikipedialogo.png This page uses content that was added to Wikipedia. The article has been deleted from Wikipedia. The original article was written by these Wikipedia users: Mychurch.org and Gentlewhisper. As with the Web 2.0 Wikia, the text of Wikipedia is available under the GNU Free Documentation License.

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